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Critical Analysis of Two Kinds by Amy Tan

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❶When Jing-Mei fell short of achieving the lofty goal her mother set for her, her insecurity intensified. Woo's reasoning, all we have to do is contrast Waverly's instant fascination with chess to Jing-mei's refusal to practice the piano.

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Jing-mei will be a piano virtuoso. Woo trades housecleaning services for Jing-mei's piano lessons from Mr. Chong, an elderly piano teacher, who is deaf and whose eyes are too weak to tell when Jing-mei is playing the wrong notes.

Chong's efforts are so sincere that Jing-mei picks up the basics, but she is so determined not to cooperate that she plays very badly. One day, the Woos meet Lindo Jong and her daughter Waverly. Jong brags about Waverly's success as a chess prodigy. Not to be outdone, Jing-mei's mother brags about her daughter's "natural pride," and the young girl immediately becomes even more determined than ever to thwart her mother's ambitions.

Continuing to clean houses, Mrs. Woo scrapes together enough money to buy a secondhand piano. A few weeks later, Jing-mei participates in a talent show in a church hall. All the couples from the Joy Luck Club come to her piano debut. Although she has not practiced and does not know the music, Jing-mei has come to believe that she is indeed a prodigy. Halfway through the song, though, she begins to realize how badly she is playing.

The weak applause and her parents' disappointed looks reveal the unmistakable truth: Jing-mei is not a musical prodigy. As a result, Jing-mei is shocked when her mother expects her to continue practicing. During the ensuing quarrel, Jing-mei shouts the most hateful thing she can summon: I wish I were dead! Woo suddenly retreats and never mentions the piano again.

As a result, Jing-mei is shocked when her mother offers her the piano as a thirtieth birthday present. Only after her mother's death can Jing-mei accept the piano. As she is packing her mother's things, she sits down to play the piano for the first time in many years.

The story focuses on two themes: Like many immigrants, Mrs. Woo believes in America's promise: With hard work and a little luck, Jing-mei can be anything that she chooses to be. Jing-mei will not have to undergo any of her mother's hardships — the terror and privations of war, the tragedy of losing children, and the difficulties of settling in a new culture.

It is not enough that Jing-mei be merely successful, however. With her mother's guidance, Jing-mei can be a prodigy, towering above ordinary children. Prodigies, however, are born with an innate talent that manifests itself under the proper guidance, as has Waverly Jong's chess genius. To discover the fallacy of Mrs. Woo's reasoning, all we have to do is contrast Waverly's instant fascination with chess to Jing-mei's refusal to practice the piano.

Furthermore, Waverly receives only a few chess pointers from an old man in the park before she begins winning tournaments; in contrast, Jing-mei is given extensive if inept personal tutoring, yet she still plays badly in the talent contest. In addition, Jing-mei has no desire to cooperate with her mother. On the contrary, she fights her every step of the way. I wasn't her slave.

I had listened to her before and look what happened. She was the stupid one," she decides. Determined to thwart her mother's ambitions, Jing-mei neglects practicing the piano. It is only after her mother's death that Jing-mei begins to realize what her mother had wanted for her. She looks back over the music that she formerly shunned and discovers something that she hadn't noticed before.

The song on the left-hand side of the page is called "Pleading Child"; the one on the right, "Perfectly Contented.

This realization brings together the theme of the tension between mothers and daughters. The mothers and daughters in this book are separated by many factors — age, experience, ambition, and culture. The "pleading child" cannot be "perfectly contented" because she cannot resolve her difficulties with her mother — and herself.


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Essay on Rebellion in Two Kinds by Amy Tan Words | 4 Pages. Two Kinds In this story “Two kinds” by Amy Tan it shows the great expectations of a mother, who wishes for her child to be famous and a genius. The mother coming from a society that is very hard working and obedient trying to instill the upbringing she had I her life.

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Analysis of Two Kinds by Amy Tan - Analysis of Two Kinds by Amy Tan In the story “Two Kinds”, the author, Amy Tan, intends to make reader think of the meaning behind the story. She doesn’t speak out as an analyzer to illustrate what is the real problem between her and her mother.

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Keywords: two kinds essay, two kinds analysis. Amy Tan's 'Two Kinds' is a short story about the relationship between a Chinese-American mother and her American daughter. Two Kinds is a chapter from Tans book, "The Joy Luck Club", which is made up of sixteen stories about Tan growing up in America with a mother from ancient Chinese customs (Tan, ). Dec 11,  · Character Analysis “Two Kinds by Amy Tan is a short story about the relationship between a daughter and her Chinese immigrant mother. The mother had lost everything including her home, husband and children in China before immigrating to the United States in hopes of a better life.

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Analysis of Jing-mei from "Two Kinds" by Amy Tan Analysis of Jing-mei from "Two Kinds" by Amy Tan In the story, “Two Kinds”, Amy Tan writes about a relationship between a mother and a daughter. two kinds by amy tan literary analysis essay Alexis Washington Dr. Gaynell Gavin Engliosh 26 April The short story “ Two Kinds,” is a story in which a young Chinese child is struggling with her mother that wants so badly to change her into this average American girl.