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❶What are some of the limits of this reading? Just as she always played with water, ate from all the plates at once, or went swimming at dawn, she will bury Polynices.

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Antigone Thesis Statements and Important Quotes

Leaving Polynices unburied was a violation of not only the laws of the gods but also the laws of the family. After a brutal civil war, however, restoring order is the responsibility of the king. When, and to what extent, do the laws of the gods and of the state override the laws of the family? Connected to the above themes is the theme of choices and consequences. The characters in the play have free will to choose, but the consequences of their choices are guided by fate—determined by the gods.

To what extent, however, do the characters truly have free will? How much is each bound by their position in society, or by their conscience? Both Antigone and Creon stick stubbornly to what they feel are logical choices—but they are limited in their knowledge and cannot foresee all the consequences of their choices.

Too often they stubbornly refuse to listen to council, which tries to guide them in their choices. Had Antigone and Creon listened more, the tragedies may have been averted, but each would have had to sacrifice some pride as well as give up a little of who they are. Antigone is a complex play, one that defies ready interpretation. It is a study of human actions, with complex emotions.

Creon's yes forces him to condemn Antigone to death in spite all his wishes. He must kill her because the throne demands it of him; he has submitted his will to the law. Creon must condemn his niece. Anouilh also conjures the specter of the howling mob that calls for Antigone's blood, the mob that Creon rules and remains subject to. Despite these provocative correspondences between the play and the text of politics, numerous differences persist between Antigone and political allegory.

In contrast to conventional readings of the Antigone legend, Anouilh's Antigone does not defend her act of rebellion in the name of filial, religious, or even moral integrity. This insistence becomes especially clear in the course of her confrontation with Creon.

In asking why and in whose name Antigone has rebelled, Creon will progressively strip Antigone's act of its external motivations. Antigone will have no "just cause," or no human reason for bringing herself to the point of death. Instead, she acts in terms of her desire, a desire she clings to despite its madness. Just as she always played with water, ate from all the plates at once, or went swimming at dawn, she will bury Polynices. Refusing to understand those around her, she will follow her desire to her demise.

Ultimately Antigone's insistence on her desire removes her from the human community. Antigone does not act in the name of political resistance but in that of her desire. As the Chorus says, her act and arrest finally enable her to be herself. What is the function of the Guardsmen?

Consider their dialogue, their interaction with the "major" players, the Chorus' comments on them, and so on. As noted above, the Guardsmen are doubles for the rank-and-file fascist collaborators or collabos of his day. Their indifference makes them brutal and dangerous. The most poignant staging of his indifference is undoubtedly that in Antigone's cell. The pathos of the scene inheres in Antigone's appeals to the last face she will see, a face that is blind, brutal, and indifferent.

The First Guard, as small-minded as ever, responds unfeelingly to her pleas, rambling about the trivialities of his job. As with the discussion of the party during Antigone's arrest, Anouilh would thus contrast his heroine's high tragedy with the banalities that occupy the guardsmen. The Guards also stand in for the inappropriate spectator, the audience-member who remains inured to the tragic.

Thus they make two ironic appearances at the beginning and end of the play, playing cards on the palace steps.

by Sophocles

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- Creon as the Tragic Hero in Antigone This essay will compare two of the characters in “Antigone”, Antigone and Creon, in an effort to determine the identity of the tragic hero in this tale. To identify the tragic hero in Sophocles’ renowned play “Antigone”, we should first consider both the elements present in Greek tragedies and what characteristics define a tragic hero.

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Antigone essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of Antigone by Sophocles.

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Essay about Antigone - Antigone; The Tragic Hero Antigone is a classic work that never ceases to be analyzed by critics and students around the world. The debate over who is the real tragic hero of Sophocles’ play Antigone is a topic that is heavily discussed. Antigone Essay Haemon’s Actions In the play Antigone by Sophocles, every character has its position and they demonstrate it through their actions. Haemon is Creon’s son, he is engaged to Antigone at the beginning of the story.